Books, Babe

Wherein I offer *tiny* book reviews of works I have recently read.

Books set in war time:

Beneath a Scarlet Sky by Mark Sullivan. Wow. WWII in Milan. True Story. Going to be made into a movie. They kind of were the greatest generation.

The Girl You Left Behind by Jojo Moyes. Set during the Great War in France and written by the author of Me Before You. Like all war stories, this was so very sad. Good, but hard too.

YA Realism:

The Sun is Also a Star by Nicola Yoon. This is one of the best YA books I’ve read in recent years. Natasha and Daniel are two teens in New York City facing deportation and lots of family issues, all while trying to establish their own independence. This novel gives credence to the concept that everyone in the world has a story and that we are all connected to each other as humans. It is beautiful.

Far From the Tree by Robin Benway. This is a National Book Award Winner filled with teen characters that I completely loved. The adult characters weren’t as fully-realized. It’s about three biological siblings who find each other as teenagers. None has a perfect life, but their sense of family and identify grow and evolve in an inspiring way. Salty language warning.

YA Fantasy:

The Queen’s Gambit Trilogy by Beth Brower. Super addictive. A sweeping world-building series. Kind of like Game of Thrones, but without dragons and with a PG rating. I raced through these books and instantly wanted more.

Blood Rose Rebellion by Rosalyn Eves. This novel by a fellow Segullah sister (!) begins in Victorian London, where magic is the primary force by which people achieve status and wield power. Much of the book takes place in Hungary, and is a layered tale which explores the roles of innate gifts, choice, and social strata in determining the outcome of one’s life.

The Hazel Wood by Melissa Albert. Super creepy and creative horror story. The first two thirds of the book are terrifying and amazing; the last third kind of goes off the rails. Quite weird. The fairy tales in this story are real and uber dark. Again, beware the salty language.

Memoir:

Educated by Tara Westover. I am obsessed with this book. The author was raised in Idaho by survivalist, extremist Mormon parents. She had no birth certificate and never attended school. With mental illness and abuse as foundational pillars of her childhood home life, she nevertheless taught herself enough math to pass the ACT with a 28, which was sufficient to be accepted to BYU. Ultimately, she earned graduate degrees at Cambridge University and a fellowship at Harvard. Horrifying, inspiring, and BEAUTIFULLY written.

Classic:

Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte. This is my second time reading this, one of the most well-regarded books in the English language. I figured because I loathed it the first time through all those years ago, it deserved another look. You’re probably already familiar with the story, but if not, allow me to toss a few descriptors at you: DARK, STORMY, SAD, MELANCHOLY, WIND-SWEPT, DEPRESSING. The skill with which this story is told as a tale within a tale (practically within another tale) is stunning, and the language is, well, remarkable. The Brontes WERE geniuses, you guys. And the fact that Emily died at age 30 after WH‘s publication makes her masterpiece even more tragic. I’m glad I read it, but Jane Eyre by sister Charlotte is still the best book ever. Feel free to disagree, but you will never change my mind.

What are you reading?

  3 comments for “Books, Babe

  1. Barb
    March 19, 2018 at 5:59 pm

    I want to read these all immediately. I agree, Jane Eyre is better than Wuthering Heights. I feel like classics, especially ones that can be difficult, deserve a rereading every decade or so, so that I can better experience them through different lenses of my life. WH probably needs a re read at this point.

  2. Laurie Holman
    March 20, 2018 at 12:11 pm

    Now you are inspiring me to read both Bronte sister’s books. I have them but have never read them. That might be my distraction this spring.

  3. Jules
    March 27, 2018 at 9:46 pm

    Thanks for sharing. I’m adding a few of these to my reading list!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *